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Your publishing industry superstore; discussion of current trends, helpful resources and websites, query letter tips, writing contest information, and all else related to this dynamic industry.
Posted: 10/12/2010 12:49 PM PDT
I am new to webook and I think it is a great place to meet other aspiring writers and learn how to write better. I try and review/rate each time I visit and I have learned a lot doing the challenges. Whether or not I ever get published is not even a blip on the radar at this point, I just like the camaraderie and the helping/critiquing process to help each other grow as writers. If this site goes away, as some of the rumors seem to say, I will definitely miss it - and I have only been here less than two months! Looking at it in this manner, it is anything BUT a scam.
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Posted: 9/2/2010 7:29 AM PDT
Dallas Tanner wrote, "The magic nbumber is 4 - it is your fourth novel, rather than your first, where your craft is honed snough and you have gained enough experience to see results from your efforts." This was true for me -- it was my fourth novel that got published. Also my fifth and sixth. Now I need to get back into the finishing mode. I am really good at first drafts, but have gotten lazy about finishing. Somebody kick me in the butt!
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Posted: 7/20/2010 11:42 PM PDT
Dear William, I have one submission in the Page to Fame contest and although the overall experience has been positive, (albeit painfully slow) there is one thing that may help with the level of complaints you're experiencing. I did consider the fact that any old troublemaker with too much time on their hands can submit negative votes just to be vicious. Although that is bothersome to me, I also considered two things: 1) I noticed that when I received a vote of 1,2 or 3, it dragged down my average far worse than when I received a positive vote. A couple of bad votes was much more difficult to recover from. And 2) Perhaps Webook should consider punishing the thrill-kill voters. Webook has an algorithm for the Page to Fame contest, perhaps they should have an algorithm that sniffs out the crooks and shuts them down. Stand up for your faithful followers Webook! The Page to Fame participants can't fight against an anonymous attacker. Thank you for the opportunity, Jennifer B. Fields Author of Paranormal Fiction
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Posted: 2/7/2010 12:06 AM PST
I wouldn't worry. I'm not here to get published. I'm here to spread the word of my book projects and help out other fellow authors with their writing. :0)
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Posted: 1/17/2010 9:27 PM PST
"I'm sick of webook dumb ass. because its taking waaay too long for an agent to read & contact you. nobody ain't got that kind of time to sit and wait until an agent contact you."? It's no wonder you're not getting published. Your grammar and spelling in that little snippet was horrible. And if you are sick of WEbook, get off of WEbook!
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Posted: 12/24/2009 4:49 PM PST
I think that the whole point of webook is for authors young and old to connect with people around the world and get help and discuss there novels with other people who can give them a second opinion
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Posted: 12/8/2009 4:21 PM PST
I think you folks are missing the point about WeBook. It is not here to publish your book - it is a meeting place so writers and publishing professionals have a place to meet and discuss their attempts to find one another. I have been at this for 7 years now, and the wheels have slowly begun to turn for me. The magic nbumber is 4 - it is your fourth novel, rather than your first, where your craft is honed snough and you have gained enough experience to see results from your efforts. We should slam the likes of Stephanie Meyer and especially J.K Rowling, who hit paydirt out of the gate. Have an original idea, or one that taps into the whims of pop culture. If you want to produce a book that seels, write one they want to be. That's all there is to it - just give them what they want. And what is that? Well, you've come to the right place to find out...
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Posted: 10/25/2009 6:34 PM PST
With a name like Scammalamma I would have expected nothing less than pointless rambling about how a site, that has stood for years now, and have helped many people (including myself) find criticism and in some cases agents, it a complete scam. I'll say nothing more on the matter, apart from to advise YOU to leave Webook and stop trying to cause ructions for everyone else, and to my FELLOW WEBOOKERS I plead you not to reply to this and let this paranoid, delusional post die and the poster crawl back to the primordial gutter that it belong.
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Posted: 10/25/2009 2:57 AM PST
Not true. I've sent one of my stories off to agents and I've yet to hear back for some, while others were quick to respond. weBooks agentinbox is about on par for speed. Plus you can tell what they've read and what they haven't. Its refreshing to see they actually read what you send them before they hit the reject button. Most agents respond within 3 months if you go the normal query route, webook's route took less than a month. To me, that's a great turnaround.
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Posted: 10/24/2009 12:43 AM PDT
Most publishing companies are decades old. Webook's only been around a short time. Give them a chance. If don't like it, figure out a different strategy for getting published.
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Posted: 10/16/2009 7:05 PM PDT
I understand that agents and publisher have alot of submissions to read but most publishing companies gives you a quicker response than webook.
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Posted: 10/15/2009 4:23 PM PDT

pdsa1
Excuse me for saying this but I have this book that tells you what process. That an agent has to go through to accept the strory and yes it will take alone time. There the ones we need to get our stories out on the shelves ..they have a pile of other stories to.. so some of them will of course be rejected or take along time...to read or load you story onto their system as every thing is hard disk or USB now.. Though some still accept paper copies but typing them out and finding a editior takes time... This is what they are doing for us... WEBook is a good stepping stone to start of on.. Honestly due to recent strikes it may take longer for your stories to reach the agent if indeed you sent it by the post.. However problems may occur if the WEBook site goes down... I know it can happen.. Paitent is a virtue my friend.. just give them chance ....
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Posted: 10/5/2009 11:04 AM PDT
I'm sick of webook dumb ass. because its taking waaay too long for an agent to read & contact you. nobody ain't got that kind of time to sit and wait until an agent contact you.
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Posted: 7/6/2009 1:35 PM PDT
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PublishAmerica It's one of those companies that claims to be a traditional publisher, but it actually operates more like a vanity press. I imagine it could be a good way to publish, depending on your goals, but it's not the same as getting published by Random House.
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Posted: 7/5/2009 7:48 PM PDT
I don't understand. Whats wrong with Publish America?
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Posted: 7/3/2009 6:35 PM PDT

JaySundy
Scammalamma, there are more dignified ways of expressing this sort of opinion. I defend Publish America. They published my first book, and have upheld all contractual agreements.
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Posted: 5/3/2009 11:44 AM PDT

TsungChi
:)
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Posted: 5/1/2009 6:16 PM PDT
"You're killin' me. You're really, really killin' me." Quote from little boy in Daddy Day Care
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Posted: 5/1/2009 2:15 PM PDT

TsungChi
Close. We should have a decision by next week. Tx.
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Posted: 5/1/2009 7:12 AM PDT
speaking of which...and not trying to be pushy but I am very anxious...how close are you guys to making a decision?
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Posted: 4/29/2009 12:14 PM PDT

TsungChi
Good points Xila31..... Yes, we are committed to publishing what we hope will be successful books -- and vote results are one of several factors we consider when making publishing decisions. And yes again, it's always good to have an expert look over any type of contract. Tx. William - WEbook
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Posted: 4/20/2009 3:06 PM PDT

NavarCrow
Vampires have been played out for nearly a decade! And if you think Webook is a scam then you're in it for the money, not the story, and no one reads that kind of garbage. 'nuff said!!!
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Posted: 4/18/2009 7:44 AM PDT
Hello Xila31: I don't know if getting a lawyer is a practical idea. Lawyers are very expensive. My entire income consists of monthly disability payments and food stamp credits. I definitely couldn't afford a lawyer, and I don't know if Legal Aid handles business law. However, if my entry is chosen for publication, I plan to look for a reputable Literary Agency to represent my interests. They work for a commission of 10 percent, and their help should be enough.
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Posted: 4/14/2009 11:54 AM PDT
If anyone else noticed, the voting cycle in January ended with the chosen books each having less than 100 votes each. I think one was 80 and the other 50, or somethin glike that. All of the "runners up" had far more votes, many over 200, and they didn't make it. Why? Because there is obviously more to this process than just voting. WEbook is trying to make money somewhere, so choosing a book that has 500 votes but is full of errors and will take perhaps "years" to edit is not practical. Also, they want something that will sell. As for the contract, it is the author's job to read that contract or even take it to a lawyer to ensure that it is fair and equitable. Don't just sign because you were chosen. That is utter foolishness. You can choose to pass. Also, now that it has been stated by Melissa that webook is primarily internet based books, learn about DRM (Digital Rights Managment.) Learn if they use DRM, what type of DRM, is it invasive or harmful to the consumer. Decide if this is something you agree with or not on your own terms. Don't just sign your work away. Of course we want to protect against piracy, but the majority of DRM out there is to protect greedy CEOs and does nothing to stop piracy. As with anything, you have to do your homework. Just keep that in mind.
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Posted: 3/22/2009 6:41 PM PST
I know this is an old message but I just want to say-"go you" for respectfully putting him/her in his place! Webook rocks!
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Posted: 2/22/2009 5:17 AM PST
I hate Twilight not just because it's poorly written and satan-awful, but also because my culture, my people INVENTED vampires. And the vampires of Macedonian folk tales are not sparkling stalkers who play baseball in the rain, but all around violent rapists and pretty cool guys (vampires in Macedonian folklore are always male for some reason). She basically took our vampires and raped them in every orifice. gah. That needed to get out.
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Posted: 2/19/2009 6:51 AM PST
Twilight was...terrible. The worst thing to happen to literature since JK Rowling. One time thing? Vampires have a long history in folk tales and literature. The awkward ramblings of a middle aged woman who wishes she had a 17 year old vampire boyfriend doesn't compare. Had to be said.
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Posted: 2/17/2009 10:20 AM PST

Cortne
Oh my gosh, yes! Vampires and being in love with them is getting old. Twilight was it, no more vampire stories are ever gonna live up to it. That was a one time deal! Im a 16 year old, but my story i'm working on is base on experiences of my friends and just from my imagination. Its about real things that happen. Like sexual abuse and confusing love and new feelings. By the way, if you'd like to read it its called Outloud. =]
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Posted: 2/13/2009 9:38 AM PST
I feel we're going on a bit of a tangent from the real topic here... But I have an opinion about this, and theres no stopping me now!! I have a problem with the typical angst-ridden 16 year old girl writing (of the stereotypical variety. I would hate to say that this is pointed at every 16 year old girl) is that a lot of them write based on their own personal experience. Or at least claim they do. When their poetry is as demonic and dark as you suggest and, of course, typically about love stricken vampires, I immediately DON'T want to know anything about them and their personal experiences. Then of course, I wouldn't read on. Within the people I speak to a lot, I run into a lot of similar personalities to the above. The majority of them, after I descover their truths and mysteries, turn out to have just as much a mundane and normal life as anybody else. Their 'personal experiences' draw from selfish fantasies in order to make their lives seem worse than the next person. Its almost a blessing when I get to speak with someone who actually HAS had such experiences. If their 'personal experiences' are a result of the aformentioned, I wouldn't want to read on. Its a lose-lose situation for them. My very off-topic point is, I trust most of the (fictional) stories that are NOT drawn from personal experience. If I can feel I can trust the author, then I will be happy to read it. If the author writes about themselves, or an avatar of themselves, who also happens to fall in love with a vampire and become like one then it might have the opposite effect. I really hope nobody I speak to a lot reads this!
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Posted: 2/11/2009 5:02 PM PST
Sorry, bad mood... >.< A bit harsh there, so let me clear things up kindly-- WEbook is a place for authors of all kinds, whether they be 80yr old men or 16 yr old angst ridden girls, it doesn't matter. Plus, just because you post your novel on webook to get reviews, you don't have to publish here. I believe you had that wrong. Also, beware of the contract that your thinking of. People lie, and you might have gotten stuck in one. Sorry for the last post, Misty Karen
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Posted: 2/8/2009 8:17 AM PST
I get the impression that people treat WeBook as a short-cut to getting published. With two books being published a year and tens of thousands of books posted on the site, I think that might be the wrong approach. In actual fact, it is a place of motivation and dispensing imagination more than anything, for those who want comments and criticisms for their writings. When it comes to publishing and people who solely want a book to be published, there are thousands of publishers out there who can help you and only require a little more effort. Those books that made it into the top 10% may get the same results and response from any other publisher - that their book still needs improvement. WeBook needs to consider the entries in the same way as any other professional publisher: would this book be a success both critically and financially? Does it relate well to its audience? They should never publish books based on the book's current online fanbase, which consists of a minority of WeBook members.
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Posted: 12/7/2008 9:23 AM PST

Satyr
WEbook seems to be a supportive community of people interested in writing. It is worthwhile for that reason alone. It provides us with resources that sometimes cost money or come so covered in advertising that they are annoying to use on other sites and runs reasonably well. The design is well thought out and it seems to have few bugs. I trust that their security is good and that they have ample backup in case of emergency, but you are an idiot if you don't have copies of all your work anyway. What more do you want? The voting system may be open to abuse but I suspect that there is quite a lot of editorial input on the actual choice; this is not a political issue but a business and literary one. If I were the editor I would check carefully to make sure that I agreed with the voters about the ultimate choice.
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Posted: 11/24/2008 9:18 AM PST
WEbook is committed to finding and publishing successful books. User votes are one way for us to do this, and votes are only one criterion we take into account when making publishing decisions. We use votes to help elevate the most worthy projects; from there, our editors carefully review submitted books, looking for those that we think have a shot at becoming successful published books. If a book is in the top 10% (or even the top 1%), but we don't think it's ready to be published, we'll encourage the writer to keep working on it, and take a pass. If a book doesn't make the top 10%, but we feel strongly that it will do well in publication, we'll offer the author a publishing contract. I believe there are a few blog posts out there that refer to an outdated version of our Terms of Use (not our contract, which is negotiated on an individual basis with our authors). As a rule, WEbook now offers authors a 50% share of profits from book sales, and authors maintain all rights to their material until a publishing contract is signed. We have for the time being decided to focus on online distribution for our books, which allows us to reach far more readers than we would in brick-and-mortar bookstores, whose share of the market has been declining in recent years. In the future, we may tap into other distribution channels -- while keeping in mind that online distribution may well become the future standard for all book publishing. Pandora was created as a proof of concept by our alpha community, and we've never intended to put resources into marketing this book. Early in 2009, we'll be publishing the first three books chosen from a WEbook voting cycle, and these books will benefit from the talents of our creative, energetic marketing team. I can't comment on Publish America's model, or on your chances of getting published there. WEbook doesn't promise that we will publish every book submitted for a vote -- or even that we will publish every book that gets a lot of votes. Instead, we promise to let our users have a say in what gets published, and to publish great books.
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Posted: 11/23/2008 9:36 AM PST
What a rip-off! When the voting cycle started, webook noticed that there were some unfair shenanigans going on with the voting. People were voting down every book but their own. Then webook decided that only the number of votes would count. Then they decided that they would use the number of votes in conjunction with the percentage of negative votes. Webook also stated at the beginning of the voting cycle that 10% of the total projects would be considered. There were over 500 projects when the voting cycle started, but by the time webook was finished, webook took out all projects that had less than 10 votes. This left a little over 200. In short, webook told over 30 authors, “Go fuck yourself!” Shame on webook! Despite everything, this could be a blessing in disguise. From what has been posted on watchdog sites, webook’s contract is not author friendly and should not be signed. If you decide that you still want to publish with webook, the chances of your book ever being in bookstores is miniscule, and your book could end up like Pandora with a sales rank over 2,000,000 on amazon.com. Webook is no better than Publish America. As a matter of fact, you have a better chance of getting published with Publish America than you do with webook and THAT IS SAD!
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