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WEbook Forums > The Genre Café > Horror Forum > Favorite Horror author?
A place for all your gory horror writing discussions.
Posted: 7/29/2015 1:56 PM PDT
Stephen King, all the way.
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Posted: 1/8/2014 3:40 PM PST
Has to be Graham Masterton.
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Posted: 8/4/2013 4:15 PM PDT
Patricia Briggs is great.!!
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Posted: 8/4/2013 10:39 AM PDT
James Herbert Peter Straub Stephen King Ed and Lorraine Warren
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Posted: 5/14/2011 9:59 PM PDT
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Posted: 5/14/2011 9:57 PM PDT
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Posted: 11/17/2010 3:07 PM PST
Jack Ketchum Ramsey Campbell Tom Piccirilli
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Posted: 11/11/2010 5:46 PM PST
Stephen King and Edgar Allen Poe.
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Posted: 10/20/2010 6:04 AM PDT
This is a great question because it is a difficult one to answer. I'd say, Clive Barker, Stephen Kind, and Lovecraft. Joe Hill is quickly becoming list worthy. [url=http://thebest-creatine.com/]creatine monohydrate[/url]
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Posted: 8/19/2010 7:31 PM PDT
Definitely Stephen King. Definitely. Laurel K. Hamilton is pretty good, too...if you could consider her books horror novels. They do get pretty creepy though, so I'd say she's got it.
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Posted: 8/13/2010 7:41 AM PDT
... well, except The Hellbound Heart was a (albeit longer than most) short story, LOL. Clive Barker is in my top 5 for sure. While he does venture often into the realms of fantasy, when he turns his attention to horror, there are few that can best him. Poe is an obvious choice. Old Stephen King, prior to Misery. After that he went soft. Ambrose Bierce has some excellent tales, along with MR James and JS LeFanu. I wouldn't class Matthew Lewis as a favorite horror writer but his very early gothic tale The Monk was excellent, especially for a kid of 19 at the time. I like Lovecraft but prefer some of his proteges, August Derleth and T.E.D. Klein (The Ceremonies was excellent). In more modern horror James Herbert deserves an honorable mention for Rats, Moon and the like.
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Posted: 7/5/2010 4:40 PM PDT
H.P Lovecraft, to me, was ahead of his time. He had some seriously disturbed and creepy shit. And of course Stephen King and Clive Barker. Hellraiser is one of the only movies adapted from a novel that I like.
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Posted: 6/30/2010 1:49 PM PDT
Yes, that is the one that made laugh the most. All of those precautionary measures, so neurotic.
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Posted: 6/30/2010 6:04 AM PDT
Yeah , Buried Alive, or whatever that one was called made me laugh. But I guess it would have been scary for the non-desensitised wimps of past generations.
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Posted: 6/10/2010 12:38 PM PDT
My favorite is Edgar Allan Poe. However I have to confess that when I first read his stories, he made me laughed. After reading some of them, I found to my surprise that he was called "The Prince of the Macabre".
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Posted: 6/10/2010 8:52 AM PDT
Definitely Clive Barker or Scott Sigler
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Posted: 5/10/2010 6:11 PM PDT
Neil Gaimen and Clive Barker, are two of favorite authors. I usually like reading horror stories online from authors who write for the hell of it. I'm not fond of the "classic method" or "the new method". Shock value can only go so far in horror, but to identify and be disturbed is what gives you the nightmares. XD
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Posted: 12/21/2009 2:48 PM PST
Writers and works that I like are: Edgar A. Poe - everything H.P. Lovecraft - everything A. Merritt - Burn, witch, burn! Richard Matheson - Hell House Ray Bradbury- Something Wicked This Way Comes & The October Country William Peter Blatty - The Excorist Jack Williamson - Darker Than You Think Stepen King - Salem's Lot Dean Koontz - The Watchers & Twilight Eyes Richard Laymon - The Island, The inferno
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Posted: 12/13/2009 2:16 PM PST
Patricia Briggs. Ray Bradbury--yes, he does write horror; quite well, too.
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Posted: 11/25/2009 3:07 AM PST
Stephen King, the Dickens of America. HP Lovecraft, mystifyingly brilliant. Kim Newman, whose vampire novels are the cleverest and most imaginative I've ever read.
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Posted: 11/24/2009 1:35 AM PST
Stephen King is my absolute favorite author, I'm starting to collect all his books! Very closely followed by Anne Rice. Originals of 'The Vampire Chronicles' are really difficult to find, they're excellent though! Also Bram Stoker, he owns vampire novels, and Thomas Harris, whose mind brought us Hannibal Lecter. ^.^
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Posted: 10/1/2009 3:32 AM PDT
I'm a huge fan of splatterpunk. This is a horror genre created by Brian Keene and friends. It is a very quick, very gory read. It leaves the reader thrilled when he reaches the end of the book in a day or two. He has got to be my modern favorite but I am also a fan of Stephen King and Poe.
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Posted: 9/23/2009 9:38 AM PDT
Edgar Allan Poe, of course Stephen King
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Posted: 8/19/2009 12:00 PM PDT
Hey, I'm Larry and new member of this group, but not to writing. Mine would be : Stephen King Peter Straub Richard Metheson I have heard that Dean Koontz is good too, but I have not read any of his stuff - yet.
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Posted: 8/17/2009 5:23 PM PDT
Oh there are so many.....some of my favorites that haven't been mentioned: Peter Straub (Floating Dragon, Shadowland) Robert R. McCammon (Usher's Passing, Swan Song) Douglas Clegg (Neverland) Bentley Little (The Ignored)
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Posted: 8/9/2009 7:15 AM PDT
Yeah, you can't mention Horror without Mr. King. He's the one who renewed the genre, don't get me wrong, I love classic horror, but King's way of taking the Vampires and monsters out of the Transylvanian Castle and into the state of Maine, bringing it into the real world, makes it a hundred times scarrier.
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Posted: 8/5/2009 5:31 PM PDT
Stephen King, H.P. Lovecraft, Dean Koontz (though he's not as good), Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker, and Harlan Ellison. But I have to say Ellison and King are my favorites when it comes to stories and novels. But Poe poems are the shit, so there is that.
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Posted: 7/6/2009 9:58 AM PDT
Definately Stephen King. Salems Lot still scares me everytime i read it. Also It is well scary (that could have something to do with my clown phobia lol)
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Posted: 6/17/2009 5:06 AM PDT
Clive Barker - he was one of the first real slatterpunk authors to make it big. His prose is delicate and complex, his storytelling masterful and he really does horror well, he knows what scares the human soul, despite what his work has become now. Neil Gaimen - his writing is refreshingly rich and layered in what has sometimes become a hackneyed genre. His plots are compelling and his imagination knows no bounds.
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Posted: 6/7/2009 6:21 PM PDT
I have to vote for King and Poe.
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Posted: 5/8/2009 10:59 AM PDT
My favorite is Stephen King, but a close second ist Lovecraft, partly due to the Cthulu Mythos. Dean Koots isn't TOO bad, but I never quite got into his books. I read one horror novel by a little known author, but I don't remember the book or their name, but I remember it being really good.
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Posted: 4/30/2009 11:13 AM PDT

TsungChi
Graham Masterton is good.... (I saw Stephen King on the train one time.....scared me just to look at him)
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Posted: 4/29/2009 2:05 PM PDT

Copperdragon
Oh yeah, classic poe is the shit.....
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Posted: 4/29/2009 2:05 PM PDT

Copperdragon
My favorite is Anne rice, though some would argue that she doesn't write horror, and now that I think, I guess she really doesn't. I also tend to like Dean Koonz and Stephen king, as long as he doesn't go on and on about the micro fiber of a sweater. I've never read Richard Lymon, but he seems to be getting a lot of kudos so i should probably check him out.
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Posted: 3/29/2009 12:57 PM PDT
All of the above i agree but would also includ Stephen King
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Posted: 1/27/2009 9:45 AM PST
nothing beats a classic Poe. The man himself had such a life unbelievable he couldn't of wrote happy thoughts to save his soul I think. However.... I am not certain but I think my friend (name withheld) may be pretty close behind him. He isn't published, (but working on it) he is highly grotesquein his writing style and he works with dead bodies, makes his own bone handled knives and lives in a house all alone, secluded and doesn't socialize very well with others unless they can understand the kind of person he is. I wish he would put some of his stories up on here...they would really make you think twice about a few things and probably leave you saying OMG...WTF....He's the kinda of person where ten years from now The police would say...we found ten bodies slaughtered in his basement... and my response would be... authors and their experiments for writing, geez I tell ya.. the things we go through to get a chapter about murder just perfect..it was all for research I tell ya.
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Posted: 1/9/2009 8:00 PM PST
Edgar Allen Poe would be my favorite. Not only are they freaky, but so original and unique compared to what I see these days.
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Posted: 1/2/2009 4:56 PM PST

Dean_Draven
Robert Bloch is a legend...I didn't think I could enjoy the story of Psycho more and then I read the book. I going to check out his other work
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Posted: 1/2/2009 4:55 PM PST

Dean_Draven
Each of the above lol:)
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Posted: 1/1/2009 5:29 PM PST
HP Lovecraft EA Poe Robert Bloch Robert E Howard Sometimes Neil Gaiman I prefer classic style Victorian prose to contemporary stuff. The primary reason I can't fall deeply into any King novel is because modern writing styles are too narrow and direct.
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Posted: 12/29/2008 2:48 PM PST
Really impossible to name just one... or even 10 :o)
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Posted: 12/29/2008 12:20 PM PST

ZanneP
Edgar Allen Poe Some Neil Gaiman M. R. James Mary Shelley Bram Stoker
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Posted: 12/29/2008 11:35 AM PST

HorrorPunk
Mine would have to be Richard Laymon, who's yours?
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