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WEbook Forums > The Water Cooler > General Chat > Write the book you want to read
Let loose and have fun!
Posted: 9/24/2014 7:44 AM PDT
Participating in the challenge was fun, the limited word count gave me an excuse to be brief. That said, I do love to write - there's never been anything terribly impressive about me until I open my mouth, or set pen to paper. I can feel a power flowing through me from the void, something I don't understand. From nowhere comes words I barely even have to think about.

 I still find myself unable to write anything that didn't actually happen.
 
I feel when I write a story of my own invention it is contrived... there must be another way of doing this.
 


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Posted: 9/23/2014 9:27 PM PDT
While the first paragraphs show your frequent style in critiquing, the last two are inspiring and it surprised me because not long ago you said you felt like you didn't or couldn't write anything. So, after reading this, it was nice to see that someone with writing talent was writing and offering advice (I've learned a lot from you especially in vocabulary --more in the aspect of comprehension than production) and I'm glad you're back.
I also liked that you participated in the challenge, you should do it more frequently.
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Posted: 9/23/2014 5:25 PM PDT
This is lovely! I find myself smiling after reading it. I had too much heart on it.
*** I meant "It" had too much heart on it.
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Posted: 9/19/2014 4:36 PM PDT
I don't understand.
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Posted: 9/15/2014 9:31 PM PDT
This is lovely! I find myself smiling after reading it. I had too much heart on it.
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Posted: 9/13/2014 8:14 PM PDT
One thing I've learned from associating with writers is that all too often they have an idea in their head and immediately begin translating this idea into a book by emulating writers they have read before. This is all well and good however the resulting book is often formulaic, boring, and obviously copycat work. Point in case is the bland fiction churned out in so many somewhat niche genres (think fantasy with JRR Tolkien, Sci Fi, with Asimov, PKD, horror with Stephen King). These books may sell somewhat well, but they are doomed to be forever forgotten.
 
There is a plague of people who are constantly emulating other writers. When they are not writing they are reading blog posts about how Hemingway wiped his ass. They nip off to Amazon.com and buy his favourite brand of toilet paper. People who feel like they need to be raging alcoholics to write, people who type on a typewriter because... Kerouac did it? Kerouac also did copious amounts of amphetamine. Having done copious amounts of amphetamine I cannot recommend this.
 
What is a better idea is to, after long study of the existing body of fiction, think about what you love in a book, what you hate, and then write the book you've always wanted to read. Write your perfect story. So often I've had a protagonist do something and wondered why on earth has he done that? Or rather why did his creator make him do that. You may also have done this - so write the protagonist who does all the things you've always wanted. 
 
It's best to develop your own narrative voice, keeping a journal helps with this. I often walk around narrating what is happening around me in my head to build a strong narration. Reading other authors is great for building a wide and diverse vocabulary but nothing beats developing your own method of describing a sequence of events. Letting your own humour and personality leak into how you convey a scene is what endears readers to you and makes what could be a news report into a convincing story that people will want to read.



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