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A discussion to stoke your writing fire.
Posted: 9/16/2008 4:15 PM PDT
for five years* typing with a migraine never helps just creates more typos. LOL i still laugh at fivers.. haha what a strange word. :)
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Posted: 9/16/2008 4:14 PM PDT
Hi Melissa, Thank you for the lovely advice, I like the idea of starting out small again after writers block for fivers(till this day I seem to be the only person I know who has had writers block this long LOL) but writing a few short stories of 1,000 words seem like an excellent idea. Then once i get back into the flow of thing's i can begin working on my novel. I'll also take everything else and try to remember all the good advice down the raod when i get back to this novel. :) Thank You again. Many blessings.
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Posted: 9/16/2008 10:10 AM PDT
Hi, Sarrbright, glad you're posting here. I think others have adequately critiqued the paragraph you posted (especially the advice about repetitive sentence structure/length and words ending in -ly) -- I just wanted to add that, if you're struggling with writer's block, it probably is a good idea not to dive right into a novel after a 5 year break from writing. Work on some shorter stuff, do some free-writing, take a notebook to a coffee shop and make up a 1000-word story about the most interesting person you see there -- get yourself limbered up with fun, low pressure stuff, and then come back to this project. When you do come back, don't worry about getting the first paragraph of the prologue perfect right off the bat! It's a waste of time -- a novel is a seriously long undertaking, and by the time you get to the end, the beginning may no longer work, no matter how much time you spent making it "perfect." I recommend a "white hot first draft." (I stole that phrase from someone, but I can't remember who -- sorry.) Write through the whole thing once, just as fast as you can, not worrying about making it perfect, or even about fixing outright mistakes as you go -- for example, if you decide on page 150 to change your main character's name, just draw a line, make a note, and use the new name from here on out. Don't go back and fix ANYTHING until you're all the way through a first draft. That draft is for you to tell the story to YOURSELF. After that, revise it with an eye to telling the story to OTHERS. Have fun!
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Posted: 9/16/2008 5:00 AM PDT
Thank you for the lovely advice everyone i will most diffantley take it,i appreciate the tips and everything. :) I may put this semi short novel down for a while and work on something else just to get the hang of writing again, i've put writing off for five year's so i'm rather out of practice. :)
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Posted: 9/15/2008 10:49 PM PDT
Please don't tell the reader the night was terrifyingly cold... show them. Be wary of words that end in LY as they usually denote telling. Of course, a writer can't show everything and in some instances telling is good but for an opening could you let the reader feel what's going on. I don't want to be too critical - and this is an early draft - but check you are using words in the right context. 'Evokes' and 'haste', for instance. Try not to write as you think a writer would - better to write more like you speak. good luck.
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Posted: 9/15/2008 9:36 PM PDT
Hey Starrbright, I think this is a good place to post about dealing with your writer's block. Also, if you want to include a link to the larger piece, I'd be happy to take a look at it. There are two things that strike me about the snippet you've posted. The first is that the sentence structure of all three sentences is very similar. You have three long sentences connected with commas and a semi-colon. I would try breaking it up a bit, so that you have a mixture of longer and shorter sentences. That might help you with the flow and rhythm of the writing. The other thing was the contrasts in the subject itself-- you've described a spooky, misty graveyard, so why is the character strolling leisurely? If she's so relaxed, why are her knees ashen? If I was putting a rose on a grave, I think I would be more solemn. I wouldn't be going for a stroll- I'd be trudging through the wet grass, my face contorted with the pressure of holding it together until I found the right gravestone.
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Posted: 9/15/2008 9:05 PM PDT
Hello All, I'm new to the WeBook and love it. I have been going through some writers block(what a pain!). I've been working on a novel, but been having problems with the beginning of the prologue, I've been sending re-writes to my friend back and forth for a week now but we both can't seem to figure out what is missing, it's okay but diffantly does not have it's flow if that makes any sense. :) here is a sample as to what i have so for I'm hoping someone might be able to give some feedback as to how to fix it to make it flow more as well as more understandable for the reader. :) PS- hope im posting in the right spot :) "The night is terrifyingly cold, as the ghostly fog creeps over the dark graveyard, while a dewy mist evokes up from the shivery ground. A young woman leisurely walks towards a broad tombstone, gazing softly at the unique structure, she looks down at the name. Leaves begin to haste within the area; as the young women lowers her ashen knees, she gently puts a single red rose on the cold moist stone." this is just the beginning of it. I can already see some coma errors, the spelling is okay as well as the grammar but there is always room for improvement.. I appreciate any kind feedback and or advice, it will be rather helpful to finally figure out what's missing and why it seems to not flow smoothly. :D
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