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A discussion to stoke your writing fire.
Posted: 9/10/2008 1:32 PM PDT
Its sound quite an edgy fast paced book and I think they always work alot better when written in first person. Or if you character would be a little hard to like as they were somebody you meet. Its a great way to explore their emotions and view on the world in first person. xxx
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Posted: 9/9/2008 12:35 PM PDT
By the way, you can start with dialogue AND write in first person. Dialogue counts as an "action" to start your story.
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Posted: 9/9/2008 12:34 PM PDT
Beejay gives great advice for deepening your understanding of your story. Here's a formula I sometimes use to structure stories when I have an idea, but don't know where to start: It's called A,B,C,D,E -- Action, Background, Conflict, Development, Ending. By starting with an action, you do what Beejay suggests -- grab your reader's attention right off the bat. The action you choose should be something that causes the reader to wonder either "Why?" "How?" "Who?" "What?" or "When?" "Why?" is probably the juiciest question to raise. You might even be able to raise more than one question in the reader's mind! For example, if I start a story with this action: "I walked to the edge of the cliff, holding the jar of three-penny nails. I took a deep breath, and threw the nails over the edge. As the jar shattered on the rocks below, I felt a twinge of regret, but I brushed it away. It was either the nails, or me." This action makes the reader ask several questions. Why is the narrator holding a jar full of nails? Why does she throw them off the cliff? Why does she feel regret? Why is it "either the nails, or me"? These questions create the suspense that will draw the reader into the story. After an initial provocative action, you can spend some time developing background. Background can include setting the scene, describing the situation more fully (without giving away the central mystery), and giving the reader information about your character and her world. Next, you establish the central conflict that will drive the story. Whereas the initial action suggests conflict ("It was either the nails, or me."), you should now make it clear, in concrete, specific terms what your character is struggling with at this decisive moment in the story. Development is, basically, the rest of the story: The "what happens." Depending on the length and complexity of the story, you might let the initial conflict develop for a while, then introduce some new conflict, and go through A, B, and C over and over again -- or just A and C, or just B, or whatever. In a short story, you might want to stick with just one main conflict, and one arc of development. The ending is what it sounds like. The story ends. The conflict has either been resolved, or has evolved in some satisfying way. A,B,C,D,E is called a "formula" for a reason. It's fun to play around with different ways to structure a story -- but this is one way to jump-start the process if you don't know where to start. Good luck!
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Posted: 9/9/2008 7:16 AM PDT
Like any good film script, the best way is to grab your reader on the first page, or at most, by the third page. Ask yourself some questions about the character first. Why is she seeing demons in the first place? Research the young girl's backgound, make notes and then "Sleep on them." When you wake the next day, scribble the first things that come to mind on your notepad. Generally, you find those first ideas are the ones to use - they come from your subconscious level. Just to give you an idea - e.g. Perhaps she has died in a previous life-time, killed by a lion or tiger. Much more likely, and also topical, her fahter has raped her and she is now scared of him - the demon would then be merely a symbol of her father who comes to life. I hope you find my thoughts helpful Beejay.
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Posted: 9/9/2008 7:09 AM PDT
Hi, I agree with the other comment, you should write it in first person. As already suggested it can be more compelling and from a personal point of biew it would be more likely to grab my attention
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Posted: 9/6/2008 8:27 PM PDT
i would write it in first person. it's more compelling to read it from character's points of view.
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Posted: 9/6/2008 1:01 PM PDT
i need help im writing a fiction book about a young girl who has brought her demons and lies to life in chapter one- basically growing up to become a nymphomanic. should it start with dialougue or should i write it in first person
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