This will flag comments for moderators to take action.

A discussion to stoke your writing fire.
Posted: 9/14/2008 2:06 PM PDT
Everyobe gets rejected all the time. JK Rowling, the woman who wrote the Harry Potter books, was rejected by numerous publishers and even told that she'd never make money selling those books. Well, you can see how wrong they were! Keep trying. Maybe that first story wasn't the best for that competition, but if you work hard, you'll make something twenty times better. :)
Sign-Up or Login to Reply

Posted: 9/14/2008 10:01 AM PDT
You just have to pick yourself up and start writing again! Keep doing whatever makes you happy, it doesn't matter what anyone else thinks, though, as a fellow writer, knowing that someone likes you stuff always makes you feel better. Plus, you could have some unknown fans, it's like being crushed on. You never know who it is and sometimes you never even get to know that someone likes you! I write because it makes me happy and kills time, and for a sense of completion. You can do it!
Sign-Up or Login to Reply

Posted: 9/7/2008 8:37 PM PDT
Thanks for the advice, and don't worry there's no way i could give up. i really appreciate your tips, thank you. :) n
Sign-Up or Login to Reply

Posted: 9/7/2008 8:36 PM PDT
Wow, thank you so much for that. Really. I think that's just what i needed to hear. You must have some great talent yourself. All the best :) n
Sign-Up or Login to Reply

Posted: 9/6/2008 8:25 PM PDT
Don't worry. if you know your work is good then that's all that matters. just remember you are doing some thing others wish they could but don't have the encouragement to do it. you are following your dreams and reaching for the stars. you are living out your dreams and others don't know where to begin. as long as you have inspiration in your heart and a pen and pad you are a true writer.
Sign-Up or Login to Reply

Posted: 9/5/2008 7:43 AM PDT
Oh, man, hurt pride is the worst. A few things: 1) Rejection is part of being a writer. No matter how excellently talented you are, your work will be rejected far more than it's accepted. You have to develop a very thick skin. As you progress with your writing, you'll get fewer rejections and more acceptances -- but it takes a lot of work to get there. 2) I don't have a story exactly like yours, but I had a LOT of stories turned down by literary magazines before I got my first one published. The fact was, even though I had talent and I loved to write, my work wasn't mature enough for publication until I'd been working at it for many years. Luckily, I loved it enough, and I got enough encouragement along the way to keep going with it. Placing 25th in the semi-finals of a novel-writing contest, and getting positive feedback from your readers, is definitely enough to tell you to KEEP GOING. Don't worry too much about whether or not you're going to win a Nobel Prize next year -- focus instead on learning and improving. Write a lot, and read a lot -- your work will get better! 3) It's a cliche, but: "Talent" truly is 10% inspiration, 90% perspiration. I went to a well-known graduate creative writing program. (Columbia University.) It's a big program, and the majority of my fellow students will never publish a book. Who will? The most talented students? Sometimes. But more often, it's just the ones who KEEP WRITING after graduation. 4) Keep writing! But don't necessarily jump right into the next novel. Novels are long, hard enterprises, and one of the worst things a writer can do is undertake one before she's ready -- or before her ideas are ready. Spend some time writing shorter pieces for a while. Read a lot. (A LOT!) Maybe take a creative writing class, if one is available in your area. A novel might be too much pressure right now. Start small, and don't worry -- if you keep at it, and if the novel is meant to be, you will write it when you're ready. Good luck!
Sign-Up or Login to Reply

Posted: 9/5/2008 2:23 AM PDT
I entered my first book in a competiton on another website earlier this year, and i received very positive responses from all who took the time to read it, but i made it to about 25th in the semi finals. now i know this was good considering it was my very first complete novel, but i think somewhere in the back of my mind it created severe doubts about my talent. As a result, i've reached the fifth chapter of my new book, i love the story, i can see where to go next, but if i sit down to put pen to paper (or fingers to keys) my mind flatlines and i just end up playing solitaire with a glum look on my face. I want to pick myself up off the ground and keep going, but my faith in my abilities has been shaken and i just don't know how to get back on track. Does anyone have any advice? Perhaps a similar story and how you managed to fix the problem before you resorted to jumping off a building? Any help is appreciated.
Sign-Up or Login to Reply